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Live in Montana Real Estate has a record of success.

With offices in Augusta and Craig/Cascade and agents across Montana, we can serve your buying and selling needs well. Look for us in Augusta, Craig, Cascade, Choteau, Cut Bank, Great Falls, Fairfield, Hall, and now, Bozeman!

Live in Montana Real Estate is privately-held and locally-owned. We are a cooperating brokerage.

We understand that selling properties in Montana needs to take into account the unique character of the land and the people who LIVE here. 

Live in MT Real Estate News

Property Appeal: What Makes a Home Safe?

Location. Layout. Landscaping. A host of home features affect a property’s appeal. One quality that tops many “must-have” lists is safety. Several features can improve the safety of a home. As a bonus, these devices may also reduce the cost to insure a home. If you want to modernize your home with innovative safety measures or are looking for a new home with the latest safety features, consider these list toppers.

Smart Devices: The internet of things has taken home security and convenience to a new level. Homeowners are empowered with a host of tools and systems to keep their homes safe. In fact, technology has become so prevalent that few items aren’t equipped with smart features. Appliances offer improved safety and efficiency. Garage doors offer additional security. High-tech lawn systems prevent overwatering and flooding. A few devices are particularly desirable for homeowners interested in boosting the safety of their surroundings. These include:

Water alerts: Did you know one of the most common homeowners insurance claims is water damage? Smart leak-detection sensors can now prevent these calamities. They alert homeowners of leaks so they can take immediate action to prevent damage.

Fire detection: What happens if no one is home to hear the smoke detector? A smart fire detector will alert a homeowner via a Wi-Fi-connected device anywhere in the world. This can improve emergency response times and minimize damage.

Burglar deterrents: Smart technology has enhanced security on many fronts. Homeowners can deter thieves with timed lighting, access smart door locks to maintain tighter security, and monitor video surveillance from anywhere.

As Seen on TV: Real Estate Myths

Jim and Suzy Homebuyer just found their dream property for $50K and fixed it up in three weeks.

Stories like this have skewed viewers’ expectations of real estate reality.

Shows about home buying and renovation projects can be fun to watch, but we may not realize that they often don’t depict the realities of buying, selling, and owning a home.

Here are three common myths popularized by today’s TV lineup.

“Three homes will do.”

On TV, a couple looks at three homes and is able to find the property of their dreams. This isn’t how things work in the real world.

The number of homes buyers must look at before finding the right one for them differs in each situation. It’s not uncommon to look at 20 homes. It may even work out that you look at just one (but it’s not likely).

“I can afford that.” 

Shows that depict real estate purchases and renovations rarely reflect prices that are realistic for viewers. We may witness a bargain deal on TV and assume we could get something similar.

The fact is, markets vary greatly. The price of a home or a remodel in the area where the show is filmed may be completely different from what we can expect in our home town – either much higher or much lower.

“This will be a cinch.” 

While some DIY projects can be completed quickly, the amount of time most renovations take is longer than TV would have you believe. Homeowners shouldn’t expect to dive into a basement remodel on Friday and wake up Monday morning with the project behind them. Even if you hire professionals, they may encounter unexpected delays or simply need more time to do the renovation right.

If you’re considering buying, selling, or renovating, the more information you have, the better prepared you can be. Contact us for some professional input – we are happy to help.

Most people believe NOW is a good time to sell a home

"The latest consumer findings from a National Association of Realtors® survey reveal that many more Americans believe that now is a good time to sell a home.

The second quarter of 2019 saw a jump in optimism in selling, as 46% strongly held that belief, up from 37% in the first quarter," according to a press release on the NAR website.

National Association of REALTORS 2019 Q2 HOME Survey GraphicClick here to view the findings: 2019 Q2 NAR HOME Survey PDF

Advice to Make Your Home Storm-Ready

Reduce Your Residential Risk

Advice to make your home storm-ready

(Family Features) In the United States, more than 100,000 thunderstorms occur each year. These storms, which can be accompanied by high winds, hail and tornadoes, can cause power outages, fires and flooding, all of which pose serious threats to people and property across the country.

When these storms hit, many of the features that make your home more comfortable and enjoyable can also pose serious risks. Learn how to prevent damage and protect your family's safety from these common hazards.

Landscaping
Lush, well-developed trees provide valuable curb appeal, but they can also be dangerous in storm conditions. Although it's virtually impossible to fully prevent damage from falling branches or even entire trees, you can minimize the risk. Prune trees regularly to maintain a safe distance from the house and power lines, and eliminate dead trees or damaged branches that are more susceptible to high winds. Take a similar approach with any large shrubs, bushes or other vegetation that could cause damage to your home or vehicles.

Decorative Features
The strong winds that accompany many storms can turn everyday items in your yard into airborne hazards. If items like decorations and patio furniture aren't secured, bring them in or safely secure them before the storm hits. Also check for decorative features like shutters, which can shake loose in a strong wind and cause significant damage to your home's exterior.

Propane Tanks
Numerous variations of severe weather, including floods and strong winds, can cause falling tree limbs or other debris to impair or even destroy a propane tank. More important than the property damage are the potential safety risks, such as gas leaks. In addition to trimming back landscaping that could fall onto a tank, also have a service technician survey your tank for possible risk factors, such as rust, loose fittings or faulty valves.

Doors and Windows
Poorly fitted or sealed doors and windows are especially vulnerable in a storm. They can invite leaks or, even worse, blow in completely when weakened by blustery force. It's a good idea to give all openings to your home a careful review at least a couple of times a year and again after any major weather event.

For additional information on preparing for severe weather conditions, visit Propane.com/Safety.

10 Storm Safety Tips

If your home uses propane, consider these tips from the Propane Education & Research Council to help keep your family safe.

  1. Create an emergency contact list with information for your propane supplier and emergency services, along with instructions for turning off propane, electricity and water. If you do need to turn off your propane, contact a service technician to inspect your propane system prior to turning it back on.
     
  2. Consider installing UL-listed propane gas detectors and carbon monoxide detectors, which provide you with an additional measure of security. Be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions regarding installation, location and maintenance.
     
  3. If you can hear thunder, you are close enough to the storm to be struck by lightning. Metal objects such as propane tanks and equipment, tractors and telephone lines can conduct electricity. Do not go near them. If you are caught outside and cannot get to a safe dwelling, find a low-lying, open place away from trees, poles or metal objects. Make sure the place you choose is not subject to flooding.
     
  4. In the event of a flood, shut off the gas. Turn off the main gas supply valve on your propane tank if it is safe to do so. To close the valve, turn it to the right (clockwise). Also, it's typically a good idea to turn off the gas supply valves located near individual indoor appliances. Before you attempt to use any of your propane appliances again, have a propane retailer or qualified service technician check the entire system to ensure it is leak-free.
     
  5. If a tornado is approaching, immediately take action. If you are inside your home or a building, go to the lowest level possible such as a basement or a storm cellar. If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level. If you are in a mobile home, trailer or vehicle, get out immediately and seek shelter in a sturdy building or storm shelter.
     
  6. After the storm passes and it is safe to do so, check the entire area for damaged gas lines or damage to your propane tank. High winds and hail can move, shift or damage gas lines and tanks. If it is dark, use flashlights, not candles. Immediately call your local utility company or propane retailer if any of these hazards exist. Do not attempt repairs yourself.
     
  7. Never use outdoor propane appliances like portable heaters, barbecue grills or generators indoors or in enclosed areas, particularly during a power outage. This can result in carbon monoxide poisoning or potentially death. Never store, place or use a propane cylinder indoors or in enclosed areas such as a basement, garage, shed or tent.
     
  8. Inspect propane appliances for water or other damage, if it is safe to do so. If the appliances have electric components and have been exposed to water, they can create a fire hazard. Do not turn on a light switch, use any power source or inspect your household appliances while standing in water. This can result in electrocution.
     
  9. Schedule a time for a qualified service technician to perform a complete inspection of your propane system if you suspect any of your propane appliances, equipment or vehicles have been underwater or damaged, or you have turned off your gas supply. Never use or operate appliances, equipment or vehicles, or turn on the gas supply, until your system has been inspected by a qualified service technician.
     
  10. Exercise sound judgment. Stay calm and use radios, television and telephones to stay informed and connected. If any questions arise, contact your propane retailer or local fire department.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

SOURCE:
Propane Education & Research Council

Upsizing Your Home

Unfortunately, our homes don’t always grow with us. What may have initially worked fine for a single person, a young couple’s starter home, or a family with a newborn can quickly become too small as families expand and multiple generations live under one roof.

Remodeling and adding to your home is one option for creating more space, but it can be costly, and the size of your property may be prohibitive. That’s when moving to a bigger home becomes the best solution.

WHERE DO YOU NEED MORE SPACE?

The first thought when upsizing your home is to simply consider square footage, bedrooms, and bathrooms. But it’s important to take a more critical approach to how your space will actually be used. If you have younger children (or possibly more on the way), then focusing on bedrooms and bathrooms makes sense. But if your children are closer to heading off to college or starting their own families, it may be better to prioritize group spaces like the kitchen, dining room, living room, and outdoor space—it’ll pay off during the holidays or summer vacations, when everyone is coming to visit for big gatherings.

MOVING OUTWARD

If you need more space, but don’t necessarily want a more expensive home, you can probably get a lot more house for your money if you move a little further from a city center. While the walkability and short commutes of a dense neighborhood or condo are hard to leave beyond, your lifestyle—and preferences for hosting Thanksgiving, barbecues, and birthdays—might mean that a spacious home in the suburbs makes the most sense. It’s your best option for upsizing while avoiding a heftier price tag.


P.O. Box 833
Great Falls, MT 59403

206 Main St. / P.O. Box 385
Augusta, MT 59410

66 Bluebird Drive
Cascade/Craig, MT 59421

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